Soaking of pollen

by Kathryn Borrie
(Macclesfield. Sth Australia)

Hi there, great site, thanks for the info. We are Apiarists in South Australia.Currently we are on a steep learning curve as we have collected & are drying & freezing our first batch of pollen, very exciting! Just a query, do you recommend soaking the pollen? Another site said this greatly enhances the assimilation of it? Also, my 3 year old daughter got hives quite severely on the first night after she took it, but having read your starting out guidlines I have cut back her dosage. She loves it but is on limited amounts.

Thank you & regards
Kathryn Borrie.

Angela's Response:

When the topic of how to take bee pollen comes up, I often get asked about pre-soaking. Dr. Cherbuliez is the Vice President of the American Apitherapy Society and his view about soaking bee pollen for optimum digestion is widely published throughout the internet. Dr. Cherbuliez is actually a psychiatrist who became interested in bee keeping and apitherapy and some sites claim that he has done research on bee pollen absorbtion. I have yet to be able to find or read the actual research and have no idea how or when he was able to measure the absorbtion rates of bee pollen.

Because of this and a complete lack of other research supporting Dr. Cherbuliez's claims, I am not totally convinced that soaking pollen for 12 hours is necessary for everyone. I do find that it helps those who have impaired digestion of some kind (those who suffer from Irritable Bowel, Crohns, Colitis, Gas & Bloating etc). It certainly won't hurt the bee pollen or you. On the other hand, it is well known that pre-soaking certain nuts and seeds helps those who have a hard time digesting them. So even though pollen is not a nut, it is food for thought. I personally believe that if you chew your raw pollen, the human digestive tract is quite capable of breaking down the outer shell of the pollen granule and releasing the valuable nutrients into your G.I. tract.

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Pre-soaking Bee Pollen Granules

by Mary
(Morganza, Louisiana USA)

I just received BeePollen granules. I do have chrons and my Mom has stomach issues so I think I would like to pre soak them. Do I pre soak the whole package at one time and keep it in the fridge or have to do it each I take it? Also once they are pre soaked how do I take it? Thank you.

Angela's Comments:

I would suggest pre-soaking your bee pollen in small batches as you need it. Otherwise, you may run in to rancidity issues (due to the moisture) if you don't consume the soaked pollen right away.

Angela

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Do you have to soak the bee pollen granules?

by Samm

I just read on a web page that you have to soak or grind the granules. Is this true? Would capsules be the better way to go?

I don't use the granules on food, I just take it by the spoonful in the morning.

Angela's Response:

Hi Samm,
Great question. I've written about this topic on the site several times. Here is what I have to say on the topic. Hope that helps!

"I'm very interested in adding bee pollen to my diet, but I have read that most humans need to soak bee pollen for 10-12 hours to increase assimilation from 7-12% to +-90% after soaking the pollen(to crack the shell), according to the research of a certain Dr. Cherbuliez.

When the topic of how to take bee pollen comes up, I often get asked about pre-soaking. Dr. Cherbuliez is the Vice President of the American Apitherapy Society and his view about soaking bee pollen for optimum digestion is widely published throughout the internet. Dr. Cherbuliez is actually a psychiatrist who became interested in bee keeping and apitherapy and some sites claim that he has done research on bee pollen absorbtion. I have yet to be able to find or read the actual research and have no idea how or when he was able to measure the absorbtion rates of bee pollen.

Because of this and a complete lack of other research supporting Dr. Cherbuliez's claims, I am not totally convinced that soaking pollen for 12 hours is necessary for everyone. I do find that it helps those who have impaired digestion of some kind (those who suffer from Irritable Bowel, Crohns, Colitis, Gas & Bloating etc). It certainly won't hurt the bee pollen or you. On the other hand, it is well known that pre-soaking certain nuts and seeds helps those who have a hard time digesting them. So even though pollen is not a nut, it is food for thought. I personally believe that if you chew your raw pollen, the human digestive tract is quite capable of breaking down the outer shell of the pollen granule and releasing the valuable nutrients into your G.I. tract.

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Soaking bee pollen in lemon juice?

Hi,

I chew my bee pollen but I have read that more benefits are derived from the pollen if it is soaked overnight in lemon juice so the cell wall breaks down----do you think this is true?
Thanks in advance !

Donna

Hi Donna,
Great question. I am not totally convinced that soaking pollen for 12 hours is necessary for everyone. I do find that it helps those who have impaired digestion of some kind (those who suffer from Irritable Bowel, Crohns, Colitis, Gas & Bloating etc). It certainly won't hurt the bee pollen or you. On the other hand, it is well known that pre-soaking certain nuts and seeds helps those who have a hard time digesting them. So even though pollen is not a nut, it is food for thought. I personally believe that if you chew your raw pollen, the human digestive tract is quite capable of breaking down the outer shell of the pollen granule and releasing the valuable nutrients into your G.I. tract. What I suggest is that you try both soaking your pollen and not. Then observe how you feel and make a decision based on how your body responds.

Bee healthy ~ Angela

Comments for Soaking bee pollen in lemon juice?

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Jul 19, 2011
Soaking Feedback
by: New2Pollen

I recently started taking pollen granules and realized that I was getting a crampy feeling after eating them. Even if I chew them well, I can get the feeling. I know it is related to the texture and not an allergy because I can get the same feeling from some other products, one being maca. One of the methods I employ is to put the granules into a warm/hot beverage like my morning coffee. After a few minutes the granules have completely dissolved and I do not get the "gravelly" feeling on the inside. I don't know if you can become more tolerant to the granules over time (I do with maca and only when not taken for a while do I get the upset stomach) but this works for me and would recommend it. I know that I am amazed at how different I feel on pollen in such a short period of time and did not want to stop taking it because of the digestion issue. By the way, I am male and 41 years old.


Awesome advice! Thanks so much for contributing!

Bee healthy ~ Angela

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Should I soak my bee pollen in water or orange juice?

In my research of bee pollen, I find some say to soak the granules in water or orange juice. This does not seem right to me? Is this the way to go?

Also, do you recommend keeping the granules in the freezer?

Angela's Response:

There are indeed many so called experts who recommend that you pre-soak your bee pollen before eating it. I am not totally convinced that this is necessary. I do find that it helps those who have impaired digestion of some kind (those who suffer from Irritable Bowel, Crohns, Colitis, Gas & Bloating etc). It certainly won't hurt the pollen or you. I have seen no studies showing increased absorbtion caused by soaking bee pollen but on the other hand, it is well known that pre-soaking certain nuts and seeds helps those who have a hard time digesting them. I personally believe that if you chew your raw pollen, the human digestive tract is quite capable of breaking down the outer shell of the pollen granule and releasing the valuable nutrients into your G.I. tract.

I do recommend that you keep your pollen in the freezer for storage. While refrigeration is sufficient, freezing temperatures will ensure maximum freshness and vitality.

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Bee Pollen Soaking

I have read over and over to soak your next day's bee pollen granules overnight. My question is if one day at a time's granules are all that can be soaked? That is, can I soak a week of granules at a time?

Angela's Comments:

I'm not a big proponent of pre-soaking your bee pollen so I probably am not the person to ask! But if you are to pre-soak, I don't see why you couldn't pre-soak a week's worth....

Angela

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Does bee pollen need soaking first?

by Shan
(Dominican Republic)

I have been taking bee pollen for years and attribute my energy in part to this product. I just read the following on another internet site regarding bee pollen and would like to know if you are in agreement:

Bee pollen granules need to be soaked in a tiny amount of cold water just coating the granules for a period of 12 hours before ingesting in order to crack the shells of the individual grains of pollen. (Store the granules in the refrigerator when soaking to keep cool) Bee pollen granules before a soak are not readily digestible and therefore your body will only absorb 2 - 7% Once the bee pollen granules are broken down in a soak of water or juice, it increases the absorption rate to nearly 90%. If soaking is not an option, you can always grind them to make them more easily absorbed.

Angela's Comments:

Hi Shan,
I get asked this question quite often. I am not in agreement as I have yet to be shown any study or science as to how the water/soaking breaks down the outer shell of the pollen (there are no enzymes in water to do this) Nor have I ever found any evidence or science revealing where the so called 2 - 7% absorption comes from? I don't know who did this science to determine this. I don't even know if it exists to be honest. For all I know this could be just someone's opinion. For that reason, I really don't promote pre-soaking bee pollen. I'd be very open to this concept if a reputable study or person could provide me with some hard evidence. Otherwise, as far as I'm concerned, it is an old wives tale!
And I have thousands of satisfied customers who don't soak their pollen to suggest that bee pollen is well absorbed without presoaking....

Hope that helps,
Angela

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Bee pollen digestion and should I pre-soak my pollen?

I'm very interested in adding bee pollen to my diet, but i have read that most humans need to soak bee pollen for 10-12 hours to increase assimilation from 7-12% to +-90% after soaking the pollen(to crack the shell), according to the research of a certain Dr. Cherbuliez.

I was wondering if you had any data/experience involving this?

Pierre Dekkers

Angela's Response:

Hi Pierre,
Great question. This is a pretty common topic I get asked about. Dr. Cherbuliez is the Vice President of the American Apitherapy Society and his view about soaking bee pollen for optimum digestion is widely published throughout the internet. Dr. Cherbuliez is actually a psychiatrist who became interested in bee keeping and apitherapy and some sites claim that he has done research on bee pollen absorbtion. I have yet to be able to find or read the actual research and have no idea how or when he was able to measure the absorbtion rates of bee pollen. Because of this and a complete lack of other research supporting Dr. Cherbuliez's claims, I am not totally convinced that soaking pollen for 12 hours is necessary for everyone. I do find that it helps those who have impaired digestion of some kind (those who suffer from Irritable Bowel, Crohns, Colitis, Gas & Bloating etc). It certainly won't hurt the bee pollen or you. On the other hand, it is well known that pre-soaking certain nuts and seeds helps those who have a hard time digesting them. So even though pollen is not a nut, it is food for thought. I personally believe that if you chew your raw pollen, the human digestive tract is quite capable of breaking down the outer shell of the pollen granule and releasing the valuable nutrients into your G.I. tract.

Comments for Bee pollen digestion and should I pre-soak my pollen?

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Mar 06, 2011
Pollen absorption
by: Dale

Humans cannnot digest the hard shells of some pollens. The percentage is not clear. Bees especially, but other insects have this ability. Bees use the pollen to feed the growing larvae and have special enzymes, biodegrade the shells. There is no doubt that soaking the pollen helps in this regard. If you are going to go to the trouble of consuming pollen, then get the maximum possible benefits. Use warm water less than 110 degrees farenheit. Pollen is one of the most nutrient rich substances known. If you have pollen sensitivity, it is best to consume pollen from the local area in which you live. Find a beekeeper near you. Go to a grocery store. Look on the honey shelf and read the lables on the bottles. You will find the name and address of a local beekeeper. Hope this helps.

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Soaking the bee pollen

by Michelle
(San Francisco)

I heard there is only a 7-10% absorbtion rate compared to soaking the granuals for 12 hours prior to taking them in a bowl of cold water kept in the fridge, that it can bring up the absortion to 90%. That this is because it is hard for our bodies to breakdown the granuals..is there any truth to this.
Thanks,
Michelle

Angela's Comments:

Hi Michelle,

When the topic of how to take bee pollen comes up, I often get asked about pre-soaking. Dr. Cherbuliez is the Vice President of the American Apitherapy Society and his view about soaking bee pollen for optimum digestion is widely published throughout the internet. Dr. Cherbuliez is actually a psychiatrist who became interested in bee keeping and apitherapy and some sites claim that he has done research on bee pollen absorbtion. I have yet to be able to find or read the actual research and have no idea how or when he was able to measure the absorbtion rates of bee pollen.

Because of this and a complete lack of other research supporting Dr. Cherbuliez's claims, I am not totally convinced that soaking pollen for 12 hours is necessary for everyone. I do find that it helps those who have impaired digestion of some kind (those who suffer from Irritable Bowel, Crohns, Colitis, Gas & Bloating etc). It certainly won't hurt the bee pollen or you. On the other hand, it is well known that pre-soaking certain nuts and seeds helps those who have a hard time digesting them. So even though pollen is not a nut, it is food for thought. I personally believe that if you chew your raw pollen, the human digestive tract is quite capable of breaking down the outer shell of the pollen granule and releasing the valuable nutrients into your G.I. tract.

Bee healthy,
Angela

Comments for Soaking the bee pollen

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Jul 02, 2016
Re: soaking pollen.
by: Anonymous

First, I want to thank you for taking the time to reply to all of these people (that seem to ask the same question over and over).

I might suggest that you create an FAQ page and simply link them to that, so if you do get new evidence that might change your opinion in any way, it can be reflected in one answer and not require either the editing of dozens of prior responses, or the possibility of someone calling you out in the future for an old post that you made based on information you had at that time, and which was later superseded and modified by new information. Again, you might want to consider trying that.

With that having been said, I did note that you mentioned that water has no enzymes with which to break down pollen cell walls.

While this is true...not unlike when seeds are soaked (I soak raw almonds), it is not the water that they're soaked in that deactivates any phytates, it is the bacteria (and other life forces that are also present in the medium) that make use of the hydration to perform their processes on the soaked entity. So, maybe although your answer was technically correct, it may be incomplete. Just my thoughts 😊.

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